Environment

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Environment

Quandary at the Quills

by Julielee Stitt

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Open invitation

by Julielee Stitt

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Small marsh, big impact

by Staff Writer

Ducks Unlimited Canada recently held its sixth annual DUC Day at Queen's Park.

Making a mark at Queen’s Park

Ontario’s wetlands are conservation conversation starters for “duck people” at annual event

Tamino duck

A marathon, not a sprint: conservation in Tantramar

Slow and steady wins the race as farmers and conservationists reap rewards of marsh purchase.

DUC volunteer inspects an eider nest

Eider pride

When common eider populations plummeted in Newfoundland and Labrador in the 1980s, groups of passionate volunteers worked together to save one of the province’s most iconic bird species

blue-winged teal hen

A duck in spring

Each spring, Canadians herald the sights and sounds of waterfowl as they flock to their nesting grounds. But after their long trips, life for our feathered friends isn’t easy. Ducks – especially females – undergo arduous physical and biological processes before, during and after their journeys. And once here, most hens have one shot to raise a brood.

A row of homes in Oak Bluff, Man., is reflected in a naturalized stormwater system constructed by DUC’s Native Plant Solutions. Growing in popularity, these wetland-like systems offer attractive, sustainable green infrastructure solutions that support biodiversity and connect residents with nature.  ©David Lipnowski

The new green scene

Harnessing wetlands as green infrastructure solutions to our water woes

Purple loosestrife is an aggressive invasive plant that can spread to local wetlands, reducing their biodiversity. ©Jade Raizenne

Wetland-friendly gardening

Five helpful tips to help you keep invasive plant species out of your garden…and out of wetlands

Caption: Maintaining focus on a moving subject, while tracking it with your camera, can result in a greater sense of motion in an image – a rewarding technique that takes patience and practice.©Kathleen Peterson

Slow motion

Movement is everywhere in spring. with camera in hand, it can be hard to keep up