People

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Editor's Pick

Small marsh, big impact

by Staff Writer

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Making a mark at Queen’s Park

by Peter Carter

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Eider pride

by Chelsea Murray

A row of homes in Oak Bluff, Man., is reflected in a naturalized stormwater system constructed by DUC’s Native Plant Solutions. Growing in popularity, these wetland-like systems offer attractive, sustainable green infrastructure solutions that support biodiversity and connect residents with nature.  ©David Lipnowski

The new green scene

Harnessing wetlands as green infrastructure solutions to our water woes

Sweet Mustard Soy Breasts sizzle on the grill. ©DUC/Jeope Wolfe

Thaw of the wild

Freezing wild birds? Preparation is key to enjoying a decent meal long after your last hunt

A wetland at Onandaga Farms. The Hendersons' relationship with DUC began in 1978, when the Hendersons partnered with DUC to implement five wetland restoration projects. This was followed by 20 additional projects in 1990, and three more in 1997. These wetlands range from a half-acre to 25 acres in size, and represent some of the best waterfowl habitat in Ontario.

Remembering a conservation legend

Ducks Unlimited Canada remembers and honours Gilbert (Gil) Henderson, a life-long visionary, who passed away on January 30th 2017 in his 91st year.

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In conversation with: Claude Wilson

Honouring the memory of longtime supporter, volunteer and past president Claude Wilson.

Bernie Forbes (left) with good friend and former DUC colleague Syd Hepworth. “Bernie had tremendous vision,” recalls Hepworth. “He was a big thinker and could see things that needed to happen.” ©Syd Hepworth

A farmer, a conservationist, a true son of Saskatchewan

Paying tribute to Bernie Forbes.

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Conservation brings meaning to life

Alberta Emerald Award winner Jerry Brunen looks back to see the future

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A year in the life of a DUC agrologist

In 2016 Manitoba DUC agrologist Charlotte Crawley let us follow her along as she worked hard for the ducks. Here’s life in the field through her lens.